WW2 Schaller propaganda photo of two Heinkels flying in formation

German printed text on reverse:

"Unsere Luftwaffe – Zweimotorige Kampfflugzeuge He 111 K auf einem Übungsflug über den Wolken"

"Our air force - Two-engined combat plane He 111 K on a training flight above the clouds"

As well on back "Echte Fotographie" ("Real Photography").

Aerial view by Hans Schaller.

Pretty little card.

Back has some paper glued to where photo was mounted in an album.

6 x 9 cm

 

A leading protagonist since the mid-1930s, Berlin's Hans Schaller (1911-1966) helped shape the face of aerial photography in Germany. 

In 1933, political propaganda dominated the illustrated articles and publications containing Schaller's photographs. His main area of expertise became gliding, popularly known as "Germany's National Sport".

Major civil and military flight days were taking place at the same time under the shadow of rearmament. He took numerous photos documenting these events and also the promotional activities of the German Aviation Sports Association and the work of the German Research Institute for Aviation in Berlin-Adlershof.

Schaller was drafted into Company 1 of the Luftwaffe as a war correspondent in August 1939 and took part in the French campaign as a photojournalist. Exempted from military service time and again, he worked until the end of the war as a still photographer

http://www.sdtb.de/

The Heinkel He 111 was a German aircraft designed by Siegfried and Walter Günter at Heinkel Flugzeugwerke in 1934.

Perhaps the best-recognised German bomber due to the distinctive, extensively glazed "greenhouse" nose of later versions, the Heinkel He 111 was the most numerous Luftwaffe bomber during the early stages of World War II. The bomber fared well until the Battle of Britain, when its weak defensive armament was exposed. Nevertheless, it proved capable of sustaining heavy damage and remaining airborne. As the war progressed, the He 111 was used in a variety of roles on every front in the European theatre. It was used as a strategic bomber during the Battle of Britain, a torpedo bomber in the Atlantic and Arctic, and a medium bomber and a transport aircraft on the Western, Eastern, Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, and North African Front theatres.

The He 111 was constantly upgraded and modified, but became obsolete during the latter part of the war. The German Bomber B project was not realised which forced the Luftwaffe to continue operating the He 111 in combat roles until the end of the war. Manufacture of the He 111 ceased in September 1944, at which point, piston-engine bomber production was largely halted in favour of fighter aircraft. With the German bomber force virtually defunct, the He 111 was used for logistics.

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