WW2 Propaganda photo of German Messerschmitt Me 109s parked at airfield

Pilot exiting from camouflaged tent at grass airfield. In background, ground crew preparing a Messerschmitt for flight.

German printed text on reverse:

Messerschmitt Me 109 vor dem Einsatz
(‘Messerschmitt Me 109 before use’).
 

Echte Fotografie Driesen Verlag Berlin C 2 Foto Nr B 5133 Fliegerserie 3’ 

(Published by Driesen…Aviator Series 3).

Back has some paper glued to where photo was mounted in an album.

9 x 6 cm.

(Red text is an electronic watermark that is not physically part of the photo for sale).

 

The Messerschmitt Bf 109, commonly called the Me 109(most often by Allied aircrew and even amongst the German aces themselves, even though this was not the official German designation), is a German World War II fighter aircraft designed by Willy Messerschmitt and Robert Lusser during the early to mid-1930s.[5] The "Bf 109" designation was issued by the German ministry of aviation and represents the developing company Bayerische Flugzeugwerke (at which the engineer Messerschmitt led the development of the plane) and a rather arbitrary figure. It was one of the most advanced fighters of the era, including such features as all-metal monocoque construction, a closed canopy, and retractable landing gear. It was powered by a liquid-cooled, inverted-V12 aero engine.

Originally conceived as an interceptor, later models were developed to fulfill multiple tasks, serving as bomber escort, fighter-bomber, day-, night-, all-weather fighter, ground-attack aircraft, and as reconnaissance aircraft. It was supplied to and operated by several states during World War II, and served with several countries for many years after the war. The Bf 109 was the most produced fighter aircraft in history, with a total of 33,984 airframes produced from 1936 up to April 1945.

Through constant development, the Bf 109 remained competitive with the latest Allied fighter aircraft until the end of the war.

WIKIPEDIA

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