Sunday School Mission Caravan - Kootenay B.C. 1926

Interesting snapshot of the times. Read almost like an adventure story!

'By Lakes and over Mountains in the Sunday School Mission Caravan in Kootenay Diocese, British Columbia June 20th to October 20th 1926'

Nice picture on cover of the Mission truck.

Fascinating story of religious mission around the back roads of British Columbia:

...raise the £325 in England for the van...
...we went to seek the children for the Children's Friend...
...The sky and lakes were such a wonderful blue, and the dark pine trees with the great tall pines stretching as far as the eye could see made a wonderful contrast...
...we went for twelve miles with a rock on one side and an 800 feet drop into the lake on the other; some of the corners were so sharp it was difficult to get the van round them...
...it was difficult to get to the most lonely British families, as many of them lived half way up a mountain...
...we found a mother who had not been able to get to Church for twelve years...
... we walked 408 miles to visit lonely families...
...In Manitoba I was told the Bolshevists had started to visit a Sunday School, at which, each Sunday, the Russian children are made to march past a picture of Christ and spit at the picture...

 

Last page has a summary of the work: new members, Sunday Schools started,etc..

12 pages.

Small smudge, wrinkle.

18.5 x 12 cm

Around 1918, Miss Aylmer Bosanquet proposed that teams of women travel to the isolated communities in the Canadian Diocese of Qu'Appelle in caravans to deliver religious instruction. Miss Eva Hasell took a leave of absence from her work in the English Diocese of Carlisle and came to Canada with Miss Winnifred Ticehurst to help implement the plan. The first caravan was custom built in Winnipeg using a Ford Model T chasis paid for by Miss Hasell. On May 21, 1920, they started their first 3000 mile, three month journey from Regina. In 1922, Miss Hasell provided a van and a team for the Calgary and Saskatchewan Diocese. The Diocese of Edmonton received a caravan in 1923, the Diocese of Cariboo received one in 1924, and the Diocese of Brandon received their first caravan in 1925. In 1926, the Diocese of Kootenay received a caravan, and Miss Iris Sayle joined Eva Hasell as her new partner. The Diocese of Athabasca received their first caravan in 1929. The Diocese of Rupert's Land was not given a caravan until 1935. It was originally known as the "Dorothy Hasell Memorial" Caravan until it was officially dedicated as "All Saints". The "Vanners" were also responsible for distributing the Sunday School By Post literature by collecting names and addresses. The Sunday School Caravan programme reached its peak in the late 1950's, when there were 31 caravans being used. By 1970, the caravans were concentrating more on Vacation Schools in isolated areas. When Eva Hasell died in 1974, most of the caravan work had been discontinued, but a caravan mission does still exist today in the Diocese of Calgary.

http://nanna.lib.umanitoba.ca/