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Advertising pieces, Gerlach Barklow 'Indian Maids' scenes, c. 1920s

Set of four cardboard cards, each with a lithograph image of an Aboriginal girl in nature, part of series called the 'Indian Maids'. Some have parts of a poem on the card, some have advertising attached to the back of the card.

I believe all are by the illustrator James Arthur.

#1 ‘Stepping Stones’

Image of aboriginal girl crossing a stream by walking on stones in the river. ‘Stepping Stones’ printed at bottom of image.

At bottom, on card, four verses from Bryant’s ‘O Fairest of the Rural Maidens’: “The twilight of the trees and rocks is in the shimmer of thy locks;…

One pre-punched hole at top has tear. Missing bits of paper LR corner. Chips UL and UR corners. Glue stains on back.

Image size is 4 ⅞” x 3 ⅝”

#2 ‘Stepping Stones’

Same image as above, but smaller cardboard card with no poem. ‘Stepping Stones’ printed at bottom of image.

Another piece of cardboard attached to it with a ribbon through the pre-punched holes. Back of second piece of cardboard has text on ‘The Value of AIM’, talking of direct-by-mail advertising, and Gerlach Barklow monthly calendars and blotters. Text appears to be cut off at bottom.

Crease LR corner of image

Image size is 4 ⅞” x 3 ⅝”

#3 ‘Sunset Glories’

Image of aboriginal girl looking out over body of water at sunset.

Underneath the lithograph are four verses of prose: “The sun from the western horizon like a magician extended his golden wand…

Another piece of cardboard attached to it with a ribbon through the pre-punched holes.

Back of second piece of cardboard has text on ‘One Hammer-Blow Won’t Do It!’, talking of direct-by-mail advertising, and Gerlach Barklow monthly calendars and blotters.

Image size is 4 ⅞” x 3 ⅝”

#4 ‘Among the Water Lilies’

Image of aboriginal girl canoeing on a body of water, collecting flowers. ‘Among the Water Lilies’ printed at bottom of image.

At bottom, on card, four verses from Lowell’s ‘In the Twilight: “The magical moonlight then steeped every bough and cone…

Another piece of cardboard attached to it with a ribbon through the pre-punched holes.

Back of second piece of cardboard has text on ‘One fourth of every advertising Dollar is spent for DIRECT ADVERTISING’, talking of direct-by-mail advertising, and Gerlach Barklow monthly calendars and blotters.

Lower right corner broken off, splitting text. Crease UL and UR corners. Second cardboard has bits missing from each corner, not affecting text.

Image size is 4 ⅞” x 3 ⅝”

 

A luminous beautiful original published mixed medium calendar illustration which appeared …in the 1921 "Indian Maids" calendar line, for Gerlach-Barklow of Joliet Illinois. This was created by James Arthur who worked in a style like that of of L. Goddard, where a base photograph was lavishly over-painted by the artist to create the commercial published calendar illustration...1920s/1930s saw a surge in popularity of romanticized images of mythologically depicted Native American princess figures. In the frenzied post-Great War machine age, nostalgia for pre-modern imagery was high, and the indian maiden gained popularity as a ideal in opposition to both the modern independent flapper and the outmoded and prudish Victorian woman.

http://grapefruitmoongallery.com/24866

 

The Gerlach Barklow Co. was an art calendar factory located in Joliet, Illinois, which was "one of the largest calendar and advertising companies in America." the company was founded in 1907.

Artists who worked for Gerlach Barklow included Arthur H. Hider, Bradshaw Crandell, Adelaide Hiebel, and Zula Kenyon. Many of the company's artists were women, or local residents, and many local residents served as artists' models. Lois Delander of Joliet, better known as Miss America 1927, was among the most famous models. A Gerlach-Barklow fan is displayed in the collection of the Oakland Museum of California.

Gerlach Barklow calendars were purchased by businesses to be given to their important customers as gifts.

 WIKIPEDIA