1936 photo cruiser SS Hood crew disembarking at Portsmouth England

LE SS “HOOD” EST À PORTSMOUTH RETOUR DE LA MEDITERANÉE
 
L’équipage du SS “HOOD”, croiseur de la Home Fleet, arrivé récemment à Portsmouth d’une croisière en Méditerranée quitte le bateau pour aller passer avec quelque retard les vacances de Noël qu’ils avaient été retardées par suite de la situation en Méditerranée.
N.P.M. L’EQUIPAGE QUITTANT LE CROISEUR “HOOD” à PORTSMOUTH
 
PHOTO NYT LONDRES 21/1/36

 

 

Press Photo, NYT:

THE SS “HOOD” IS AT PORTSMOUTH RETUINNG FROM THE MEDITERRANEAN
 
The crew of the SS ”HOOD”, cruiser in the Home Fleet, recently arrived at Portsmouth from a cruise in the Mediterranean, leave the boat to go spend Christmas holidays, delayed following the situation in the Mediterranean.
 
N.P.M. THE CREW LEAVING THE CRUISER “HOOD” AT PORTSMOUTH
 
PHOTO NYT LONDON 21/1/36
 

The SS Hood was in the Mediterranean for the Second Italo-Abyssinian War (October 1935 and ended in May 1936).

Small creases UR and LL corners. Picture a bit 'curved'.

18 x 15 cm

 

HMS Hood was the last battlecruiser built for the Royal Navy. Commissioned in 1920, she was named after the 18th-century Admiral Samuel Hood. As one of the largest and, ostensibly, the most powerful warships in the world, Hood was the pride of the Royal Navy and, carrying immense prestige, was known as ‘The Mighty Hood’.

She was attached to the Mediterranean Fleet following the outbreak of the Second Italo-Abyssinian War. When the Spanish Civil War broke out, Hood was officially assigned to the Mediterranean Fleet until she had to return to Britain in 1939 for an overhaul. By this time, advances in naval gunnery had reduced Hood's usefulness. She was scheduled to undergo a major rebuild in 1941 to correct these issues, but the outbreak of World War II in September 1939 forced the ship into service without the upgrades.

In May 1941, she and the battleship Prince of Wales were ordered to intercept the German battleship Bismarck and the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen, which were en route to the Atlantic where they were to attack convoys. On 24 May 1941, early in the Battle of the Denmark Strait, Hood was struck by several German shells, exploded and sank. Due to her perceived invincibility, the loss had a profound effect on the British people.

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