1934 set of 4 German ship menus ‘Monte Rosa' Norway cruise

$49.00 USD

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4 menus from trip of the 'Monte Rosa' motor ship of the Hamburg-Sud line to Norway in July 1934. She had an interesting history (see below)

She ran aground off Thorshavn, Faroe Islands, on 23 July 1934, but was refloated the next day.

Each menu has an attractive illustration at the top related to the Northern Hemisphere.

Postcard format on back.

HAMBURG - SUD

MIT DE GROSS-MOTORSCHIFF “MONTE ROSA » NACH NORWEGEN’S FJORDEN UND DEM NORDKAP
Kapitan Lübbe
  • Dienstag den 10 juli 1934
  • Mittwoch den 11 juli 1934
  • Donnersag den 12 juli 1934
  • Freitag den 13 juli 1934
SPEISENFOLGE

HAMBURG-SUDAMERICANISCHE DAMPFSCHIFFFAHRTS-GESELLSCHAFT

 

WITH THE LARGE MOTOR SHIP “MONTE ROSA” TO NORWAY’S FJORDS AND THE NORTH CAP
Captain Lübbe
  • Tuesday July 10th 1934
  • Wednesday July 11th 1934
  • Thursday July 12th 1934
  • Friday July 13th 1934
Order of Meals
 

On back

HAMBURG-SOUTH AMERICAN STEAM SHIPPING COMPANY

 

Some corner creases.

15 x 10.50 cm

 

SS Monte Rosa, was a passenger liner and cruise ship launched in Germany in 1930. During the 1930s, she operated as a German cruise ship under the name Monte Rosa. During World War II, she was operated by the German navy as a troopship. She was acquired by the United Kingdom as a prize of war at the end of the war and renamed Empire Windrush. In British service, she continued to be used mainly as a troopship until March 1954, when the vessel caught fire and sank in the Mediterranean Sea with the loss of four crew.

Empire Windrush is best remembered today for bringing one of the first large groups of post-war West Indian immigrants to the United Kingdom, carrying 492 passengers and one stowaway on a voyage from Jamaica to London in 1948.

British Caribbean people who came to the United Kingdom in the period after World War II are sometimes referred to as the Windrush generation.

The Monte Rosa, was delivered to Hamburg Süd in 1931, which operated her as a cruise ship, traveling to Norway, the United Kingdom and the Mediterranean.

After the Nazi regime came to power in Germany in 1933, she was operated as part of the Strength Through Joy programme, which provided leisure activities and cheap holidays as a means of promoting the party's ideology.

At the start of World War II, Monte Rosa was allocated for military use. She was used as a barracks ship at Stettin, then as a troopship for the invasion of Norway in April 1940.

She was later used as an accommodation and recreational ship attached to the battleship Tirpitz, stationed in the north of Norway, from where Tirpitz and her flotilla attacked the Allied convoys en route to Russia.

In November 1942, she was one of several ships used for the deportation of Norwegian Jewish people, carrying a total of 46 people from Norway to Denmark, including the Polish-Norwegian businessman and humanitarian Moritz Rabinowitz. Of the 46 deportees carried on Monte Rosa, all but two died in Auschwitz concentration camp.

Later in 1944, Monte Rosa served in the Baltic Sea, rescuing Germans trapped in Latvia, East Prussia and Danzig by the advance of the Red Army. In May 1945, she was captured by advancing British forces at Kiel and taken as a prize of war.

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