1898 Rail Schedule for London and North Western Railway

No. 174
London and North Western Railway
          Communication between
            Ireland and England
                 Via Holyhead
October, 1898, and until further notice
     
Mail Service, via Kingstown
Passenger Fares between Dublin (Westland Row) and the undermentioned stations (list of many stations, fares)
 
Holyhead Route
Passenger Fares between Dublin (Westland Row) and the undermentioned stations (list of many stations, fares)
 
Holyhead Route
Passenger Fares between Dublin (North Wall) and the undermentioned stations (list of many stations, fares)
 
Horse & Carriage Traffic
Charges to a few of the principal stations (list of many stations, fares)
 
Through Booking Arrangements between The Provinces of Ireland and England
Between North Wall Dublin and Holyhead
Mail Route via Kingstown and Holyhead
 
Packed with information!
 
12 pages. 8 1/4 " X 13 1/4"
 
Folded horizontally and vertically. Front page half detached along spine. Corner creases.Back page has staining and some text bit rubbed out along folds and small holes, stain has migrated on to previous 2 pages, as well as the little holes. 
 

The London and North Western Railway (LNWR, L&NWR) was a British railway company between 1846 and 1922. It was created by the merger of three companies – the Grand Junction Railway, the London and Birmingham Railway and the Manchester and Birmingham Railway. In the late 19th century the L&NWR was the largest joint stock company in the world.

At its peak just before World War I, it ran a route mileage of more than 1,500 miles, and employed 111,000 people. At the core of the LNWR system was the main line network connecting London Euston with the major cities of Birmingham, Liverpool and Manchester, and (through co-operation with the Caledonian Railway) Edinburgh and Glasgow. This route is today known as the West Coast Main Line. The LNWR also ran the main connection between Britain and Ireland via the North Wales Main Line to Holyhead and handled the Irish Mail. A ferry service also linked Holyhead to Greenore in County Louth, where the LNWR owned the 26-mile Dundalk, Newry and Greenore Railway, which connected to other lines of the Irish mainline network at Dundalk and Newry

In 1923 it became a constituent of the London, Midland and Scottish (LMS) railway.

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