WW2 Schaller propaganda photo of German Heinkel He 111 medium bomber plane / Carte photo de propagande avec avion allemand He 111

Propaganda photo of a Heinkel He 111 on runway.

German printed text on reverse:

"Unsere Luftwaffe – Zweimotoriges Kampfflugzeug Heinkel He 111 wird startfertig gemacht"

"Our air force - twin-engined warplane Heinkel He 111 being made ready to go."

As well on back:  "Nachdruck Verboten" ("copying forbidden")  and "Echte Fotografie" ("Real Photography").

Aerial view by Hans Schaller.

Pretty little card.

Back has some paper glued to where photo was mounted in an album.

9 x 6 cm

 

A leading protagonist since the mid-1930s, Berlin's Hans Schaller (1911-1966) helped shape the face of aerial photography in Germany. 

In 1933, political propaganda dominated the illustrated articles and publications containing Schaller's photographs. His main area of expertise became gliding, popularly known as "Germany's National Sport".

Major civil and military flight days were taking place at the same time under the shadow of rearmament. He took numerous photos documenting these events and also the promotional activities of the German Aviation Sports Association and the work of the German Research Institute for Aviation in Berlin-Adlershof.

Schaller was drafted into Company 1 of the Luftwaffe as a war correspondent in August 1939 and took part in the French campaign as a photojournalist. Exempted from military service time and again, he worked until the end of the war as a still photographer

http://www.sdtb.de/

The Heinkel He 111 was a German aircraft designed by Siegfried and Walter Günter at Heinkel Flugzeugwerke in the early 1930s. It has sometimes been described as a "wolf in sheep's clothing" because it masqueraded as a cargo plane though its actual purpose was to provide the nascent Luftwaffe with a fast medium bomber. (Germany had been prohibited by the 1919 Treaty of Versailles from having an air force.)

Perhaps the best-recognised German bomber due to the distinctive, extensively glazed "greenhouse" nose of later versions — in effect, a "stepless cockpit", with no separate windscreen panels for the pilot and co-pilot apart from the streamlined shape — the Heinkel He 111 was the most numerous and the primary Luftwaffe bomber during the early stages of World War II. It fared well until the Battle of Britain, when its weak defensive armament, relatively low speed, and poor manoeuvrability were exposed. Nevertheless, it proved capable of sustaining heavy damage and remaining airborne. As the war progressed, the He 111 was used in a variety of roles on every front in the European theatre. It was used as a strategic bomber during the Battle of Britain, a torpedo bomber during the Battle of the Atlantic, and a medium bomber and a transport aircraft on the Western, Eastern, Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, and North African Fronts.

WIKIPEDIA

 

Carte photo propagande d'un avion Heinkel He 111 sur piste.

Sur le revers, en allemand: "Notre armée de l'air - avion de guerre Heinke He 111 en préparation pour vol".

Vue aérienne par Hans Schaller, fameux photographe aérien allemand.

Sur le revers, petites traces de papier, où la photo a été collé dans un album de photos.

Jolie petite carte.

 

 

Note: The sale of these items in no way supports the actions or philosophies of the Axis powers. I am selling the historical record.

Note: la vente de ces objets n'indique aucun support pour les actes ou philosophies des pouvoirs axis. Je vends le récit historique.