WW1 RPPC photo of shot down English F.E.2b biplane 1916 (France)

Written on the negative:

Abgeschossenes engl Flugzeug Sainghin 9.3.16
‘Shot down english plane Sainghin 9.3.16’

 

Sainghin (Lille) France. 

(Red text is an electronic watermark that is not physically part of the photo).

 

F.E.2b (6356) 9th March 1916 brought down near Sainghin-en-Weppes

An oft-seen photograph of F.E.2b 6356 (20 Squadron RFC) being examined by German troops.

Melbourne-born author Trevor Henshaw writes that this aircraft was on an escorting reconnaissance patrol when at 9:45am it was forced down by a "Fokker". It was last seen by fellow pilots descending above Ligny, with steam coming from it's engine. The crew, Lt. L.R. Heywood and 2Lt. DB Grayford were taken prisoner.

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Between 1911 and 1914, the Royal Aircraft Factory used the F.E.2 (Farman Experimental 2) designation for three quite different aircraft that shared only a common "Farman" pusher biplane layout.

The third "F.E.2" type was operated as a day and night bomber and fighter by the Royal Flying Corps during the First World War. Along with the single-seat D.H.2 pusher biplane and the Nieuport 11, the F.E.2 was instrumental in ending the Fokker Scourge that had seen the German Air Service establish a measure of air superiority on the Western Front from the late summer of 1915 to the following spring.

 

 

WIKIPEDIA

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