British Print 'The North West View of Langharne Castle, in Caermarthenshire' @1790

A noble and his wife in front of Langharne Castle, Caermarthenshire Wales.

'Lowry sculp-t', engraved by Lowry.

'Published according to Act of Parliament by Alex.r Hogg, No. 16 Paternoster Row' (London)

Copper engraved print.

Thick paper. Back has some ghosting of another print not affecting front.

18 x 22 cm.

 

Wilson Lowry FRS (January 24, 1762 – June 23, 1824) was English engraver.

He was born at Whitehaven, Cumberland, the son of Strickland Lowry, a portrait painter. The family settled in Worcester, and Wilson Lowry, as a boy, left home to work as a house painter in London and Arundel, Sussex. On returning home is received some instruction in engraving from a local craftsman.

Lowry received training at the Royal Academy and worked for a number of engravers, as well as Boydell. Lowry developed a number of special instruments to assist his work: about 1790 he devised a ruling machine; in 1801 a device for generating elliptical curves; in 1806 another for making perspective drawings. Lowry was the first engraver to use diamond points and to discover the composition of a corrosive fluid for biting the lines into steel plates.

Lowry specialised in making engraving of architectural and mechanical topics, and excelled in perspective views of machinery.

Laugharne Castle (Wales)

The Castle was rebuilt by the Normans and in 1215 was captured by Llywelyn the Great in his campaign across South Wales.

By 1247 Laugharne was granted to the de Brian family. In 1257 Guy De Brian was captured at Laugharne Castle by Llywelyn ap Gruffudd and the castle destroyed. It was in Laugharne in 1403 that Glyndwr's rebellion stalled. Perhaps lulled into complacency, he was tricked by an ambush and lost 700 men. When a local soothsayer then warned him to leave the area or be captured, he retreated. After this the rebellion petered out under the weight of greater English numbers, and by 1415, Owain Glyndwr had disappeared, fading into myth. 

In 1584, Elizabeth I granted Laugharne to Sir John Perrott, said to have been the illegitimate son of Henry VIII. During the Civil War, Laugharne was captured by Royalists in 1644, the Parliamentary forces of Major-General Rowland Laugharne attacked the castle in 1644. After a weeklong siege in which much of the castle was damaged by cannon fire, the Royalist garrison finally surrendered. The castle was slighted to prevent any further use. It was left as a romantic ruin during the 18th century, and around the start of the 19th century the outer ward was laid with formal gardens.

Wikipedia