RPPC photo T. & N.O. Train Station, Cobalt Ontario @1910

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Photo postcard of Temiskaming & Northern Ontario Railway station in mining town of Cobalt Ontario. ‘Action’ photo: steam train is arriving at station, crowd awaiting arrival. In background can see buildings of downtown.

 

The station was designed by the prominent Canadian architect John M. Lyle and constructed in 1910 for the Timiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway. It is a long and low  1 1⁄2-storey brick structure, with an overhanging hipped roof which is gently curved. The roof contains pedimented dormers, with a central block Flemish gable that breaks the roofline and emphasizes the main entrance.

The railway was incorporated as the Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway on March 17, 1902, by the Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway Act of the Ontario parliament. The railway was to be a provincial Crown corporation overseen by the Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway Commission. Construction on the railway started in 1903, and the settlement of Redwater in the municipality of Temagami began as a small request stop when the railway reached the area of the Lower and Upper Redwater Lakes. As it passed by Long Lake, near the 103 mile marker, the largest silver rush in Canada was sparked by workers looking for trees for railway ties. The town of Cobalt grew out of the fortunes of silver taken from the grounds. By 1905, it reached New Liskeard in the Lake Timiskaming area. The railway reached Englehart in 1906 and Cochrane in 1909. In the next few years, several branch lines were built.

The Cobalt silver rush started in 1903 when huge veins of silver were discovered by workers on the Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway (T&NO)[1] near the Mile 103 post. By 1905 a full-scale silver rush was underway, and the town of Cobalt, Ontario sprang up to serve as its hub. By 1908 Cobalt produced 9% of the world's silver, and in 1911 produced 31,507,791 ounces of silver. However, the good ore ran out fairly rapidly, and most of the mines were closed by the 1930s. There were several small revivals over the years, notably in World War II and again in the 1950s, but both petered out and today there is no active mining in the area. In total, the Cobalt area mines produced 460 million ounces of silver.

The Cobalt Rush was instrumental in opening northern Ontario for mineral exploration. Prospectors fanned out from Cobalt, and soon caused the nearby Porcupine Gold Rush in 1909, and the Kirkland Lake Gold Rush of 1912. Much of the settlement in northern Ontario outside the Clay Belt owes its existence indirectly to the Cobalt Rush.

WIKIPEDIA


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